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    estieg
    Former Employee

    My Business Isn't Growing, Now What?

    If you're looking at your business and wondering why it's not growing, you may be wondering if it's location, advertising, proper use of social media, strategy, website.... you name it, it could be overwhelming to determine why your business isn't growing.  

     

    What have you found as the main reasons why a business isn't growing?  it's certainly an open ended question, so share your insights with us!

    If I answered your question, please mark it as the solution or give it a "Kudo"
    5 REPLIES 5
    Advocate III

    Re: My Business Isn't Growing, Now What?

    Hi Eric!

     

    My business quits growing when I quit looking for new clients. I am an independent contractor and an introvert. I frequently take on long-term projects that may last a year or two. It's easy to get lazy about marketing when I know that I have a year before I will have the time for another project. After one of these "lazy" periods, I feel like I'm starting my marketing efforts at Stage 1. 

     

    To overcome my "lazy" and introverted tendencies, I make a goal to connect with at least one new business each week. It doesn't have to be about landing a new project. It's about constantly staying in the public eye and keeping people aware of my skills.

     

    Being an introvert is a two-edged sword for me. The introvert side of me is what my clients want to hire. It is creative and puts a lot of words on the page. But, I have to fight hard against it to keep my business growing. I guess that makes me my business' best friend and worst enemy. Robot wink

    ~~ Coletta Teske | freelance writer | GoDaddy GoGetter mentor | 40 years in business | plotting my Second Act
    Helper I
    Helper I

    Re: My Business Isn't Growing, Now What?


    @Coletta wrote:

    Hi Eric!

     

    My business quits growing when I quit looking for new clients. I am an independent contractor and an introvert. I frequently take on long-term projects that may last a year or two. It's easy to get lazy about marketing when I know that I have a year before I will have the time for another project. After one of these "lazy" periods, I feel like I'm starting my marketing efforts at Stage 1. 

     

    To overcome my "lazy" and introverted tendencies, I make a goal to connect with at least one new business each week. It doesn't have to be about landing a new project. It's about constantly staying in the public eye and keeping people aware of my skills.

     

    Being an introvert is a two-edged sword for me. The introvert side of me is what my clients want to hire. It is creative and puts a lot of words on the page. But, I have to fight hard against it to keep my business growing. I guess that makes me my business' best friend and worst enemy. Robot wink


    I agree to this. I was going to say something similar. I believe most of us are salespeople. We stop getting clients if we stop marketing ourselves or networking. 

     

    Right now I'm juggling school and work, so its definitely hard finding clients. What I have trouble with is that I'm afraid to meet new clients because they might fill my schedule (if we decide to do a project together) and I won't have time to study. What do you think?

    estieg
    Former Employee

    Re: My Business Isn't Growing, Now What?

    I'd imagine letting your future clients know of your timelines and ETA will help resolve any issues before they become a problem. When I was running my businesses I always ensured my clients knew the timelines for getting things completed and how "adjustments" to the contract/work may increase that timeline.  Do you have a standard contract you use?

     

    Eric

    If I answered your question, please mark it as the solution or give it a "Kudo"
    Advocate III

    Re: My Business Isn't Growing, Now What?

    I've found it's best to be upfront with new clients. Let them know that you're also going to school and that school is your priority. I would think that they would see that as a positive and be willing to work around your school schedule. I worked temporary jobs when I was in college and clients always gave me time off when I had to concentrate on a term paper or finals. I also gave them advance warning and made sure that their projects were complete before I took time off.

     

    Don't be afraid to build relationships with potential clients. Think long-term. If you can't work for them right now, find some way to stay in contact and get to know them. Not only will you be laying the groundwork for future work, but you'll build relationships that will make it easier for you to keep a steady stream of projects coming in the door after you've finished school.

     

    Best of luck!

    ~~ Coletta Teske | freelance writer | GoDaddy GoGetter mentor | 40 years in business | plotting my Second Act

    Re: My Business Isn't Growing, Now What?

    Early on in the business life cycle, small business owners must wear all or most of the hats, it’s just the nature of starting a small business. As the business stabilizes and begins to have steady revenue, business owners have the habit of continuing to try to wear all the hats, as it is easy to think that is the most logical way to save money and earn more profit, when it’s actually opposite.

    The more hat the owner(s) try to wear during large growth phases, the worse off the company is going to be. You want to set the foundation for which your company can grow. Think of it as building a house. When the business is created and first starts out, it’s the blueprint development and getting the raw materials together to the build site. The business owner at this point should become the general contractor and start to outsource and hire people who have specialties, the GC doesn’t pour the foundation and do the electrical and plumbing, those are services of another contractor that can do it better and quicker to get the house built quicker. Same thing with small business, growth only happens when the business is built around sound business principles and it has the ability to be flexible and adapt to change with the change in industry, market and economic conditions.

    I specialize in this area. Helping small business utilize the resources available to build a foundation for which their business can grow year over year. Visit our website for more information.

    www.recenseregroup.com
    rob@recenseregroup.com

    Rob

    Rob Larochelle, MBA
    President & Principal Consultant
    The Recensere Group, LLC